gallery Get the App to see what’s in your food

Check out this app designed by the Environmental Working Group (EWG). Probably the most in-depth app available providing info not just on nutrition, but scrutinizes foods by brand–lets you know if there are pesticides present, source of ingredients, and much more.

EWG appGo to the EWG site to get the app and more info

Even easier, get  this Dirty Dozen chart showing what foods have the highest levels of pesticide and toxin contamination: Pesticide on Foods. Protect your health, choose organic when possible.

EWG’s 2015 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™:

The Dirty Dozen:

1EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Apples

 

2EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Peaches

 

3EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Nectarines

 

4EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Strawberries

 

5EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Grapes

 

6EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Celery

 

7EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Spinach

 

8EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Sweet bell peppers

 

9EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Cucumbers

 

10EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Cherry tomatoes

 

11EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Snap peas – imported

 

12EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Potatoes

 

+EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Hot Peppers +

 

+EWG's Dirty Dozen Plus and Clean Fifteen Lists

Kale / Collard greens +

 

From the EWG site: EWG’s 2015 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™

Nearly two-thirds of the 3,015 produce samples tested by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2013 contained pesticide residues – a surprising finding in the face of soaring consumer demand for food without agricultural chemicals.

EWG’s Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce calculates that USDA tests found a total 165 different pesticides on thousands of fruit and vegetables samples examined in 2013.

The USDA findings indicate that the conventional fruit and produce industries are ignoring a striking market trend: American consumers are voting with their pocketbooks for produce with less pesticide. USDA’s Economic Research Service estimates that the organically produced food sector, though just 4 percent of all U.S. food sales, has enjoyed double-digit growth in recent years. The trend is particularly strong for sales of organic fruits and vegetables, which account for the lion’s share of all organic food sales: USDA economists reported that organic produce sales spiked from $5.4 billion in 2005 to an estimated $15 billion last year and increased by 11 percent between 2013 and 2014.

Pesticides persisted on fruits and vegetables tested by USDA, even when they were washed and, in some cases, peeled.

Read the full story

SOLUTIONS

  • Protect your health by avoiding pesticides whenever and as much as possible. We’re exposed to these substances through foods we eat, contaminated water, and also when we come in contact with such substances used in homes and offices.
  • Choose organic pesticide-free, non-GMO foods and beverages
  • Get your water tested, especially if you have your own private well–make sure nitrate from fertilizer nor pesticides or heavy metals are leaching into your water supply. If needed, get a reverse osmosis water filter system installed in your home.
  • If you get ants or bugs in your home in the spring, try making your own nontoxic pest control products with white vinegar, diatomaceous earth and essential oils from lavender, catnip, lemon, basil, thyme, rosemary. Or find a nontoxic natural exterminator in your area.  Also plant these plants in your yard to keep mosquitoes at bay: peppermint, lavender, marigolds, catnip.
  • Grow your own foods without pesticides and without toxic fertilizer, try implementing companion planting techniques and composting–a great way to recycle and reduce food waste. Learn more about natural gardening techniques,  biodynamics, and nontoxic pest control measures.

 

organic farming, hippocrateas, wecologist, wecology, wecology handbook, organic farming,protect bees
Bee spotted in Chicago

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s